The effect of production system and age on concentrations of fatty acids in intramuscular fat of the longissimus and triceps brachii muscles of Angus-cross heifers

TitleThe effect of production system and age on concentrations of fatty acids in intramuscular fat of the longissimus and triceps brachii muscles of Angus-cross heifers
Publication TypeJournal Article
Year of Publication2005
AuthorsPurchas, R.W., Knight T.W., and Busboom J.R.
JournalMeat Science
Volume70
Issue2
Pagination215 - 221
Date Published2005
ISBN Number03091740 (ISSN)
KeywordsBeef, Bos taurus, cholesterol, Conjugated linoleic acid, Fatty acids, Freezing, Health care, Intramuscular fat, Meats, muscle, Oils and fats, Omega-3 fatty acids, Pasture finished, Patient treatment, Tumors
Abstract

The concentrations of fatty acids were measured in intramuscular fat from the longissimus lumborum (LL) and triceps brachii (TB) muscles of Angus-cross heifers finished either on a high-concentrate ration in Washington, USA, (US cattle, n = 15) or on pasture in New Zealand (NZ cattle, n = 16). Half of the NZ cattle were of a similar age to the US cattle (NZAge) and half were of a similar weight (NZWt). Intramuscular fat levels were higher for the LL muscle and for the US cattle but only within the LL muscle (P < 0.05). Aspects of the fatty-acid patterns that are of relevance to human nutrition tended to favour the pasture-finished NZ cattle with lower n - 6/n - 3 fatty acid ratios (P < 0.001), higher concentrations of an anticarcinogenic conjugated linoleic acid (C18:2 c9,t11) (P < 0.05) and its precursor (trans-vaccenic acid, TVA) (P < 0.01), and lower levels of the 18-carbon trans monounsaturated fatty acids other than TVA (P < 0.01). Concentrations of 20 of the 22 fatty acids analysed differed significantly between the two muscles. When values were adjusted to a common intramuscular fat level by covariance, most of the group differences remained, but a number of the muscle differences became non-significant. For almost half the fatty acids considered, there was a significant interaction between treatment group and muscle, which indicates that the results for one muscle do not necessarily apply to other muscles, although the ranking of the groups was usually the same for both muscles. © 2005 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

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